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New Arrivals - History

The author recalls his seventy-six day ordeal adrift in the Atlantic Ocean in a five foot inflatable raft, after the sinking of his sailboat, recounting his problems surviving the weather, shark attacks, raft leaks, and food and water shortages.

A memoir of the author's imprisonment in a women's concentration camp.

Tells the inspiring, true story of the Middle East hostage crisis that began in 1979, and of the unconventional means Ross Perot used to save his countrymen.

A behind-the scenes look at the rivalry between the Obamas and the Clintons reveals the animosity, jealousy, and competition that divides America's two most powerful political couples.

An account of a virtually unknown pre-World War II counterespionage operation describes how naturalized German-American agent William G. Sebold became the FBI's first double agent and was a pivotal figure in the arrests of 33 enemy agents for the Nazis.

Explores the mythology and legacy of Paris between 1914 and 1918, when romantic young men frequented cafes and drank wine despite the constant threat of invasion by Germany.

This imaginative illustrated edition brings to life one of the most devastating periods in our nation's history--the Great Depression--through the lives of American people, from politicians and workers to businessmen, farmers, and ordinary citizens.

"In Grizzlies On My Mind, Michael Leach shares his love for Yellowstone--its landscapes and wildlife, especially its iconic bison and grizzlies--as he tells tales that will delight anyone interested in the national park system, wildlife and wild landscapes, rivers and adventure"--Page [4] of cover.

Shortly after Don and Mindy Wallace move to Manhattan to jump-start their writing careers, they learn of a house for sale in a village they once visited on a tiny French island off the Brittany coast. Desperate for a life change, the Wallaces bravely (and impulsively) buy it almost sight unseen. What they find when they arrive is a ruin, and it isn't long before their lives begin to resemble it--with hilarious and heartwarming results.

"In The Explorers, ... author Martin Dugard shares the rich saga of the Burton and Speke expedition. To better understand their motivations and ultimate success, Dugard guides readers through the seven vital traits that Burton and Speke, as well as many of history's legendary explorers, called upon to see their impossible journeys through to the end: curiosity, hope, passion, courage, independence, self-discipline, and perseverance. In doing so, Dugard demonstrates that we are all explorers, and that these traits have a most practical application in everyday life."--from WorldCat.org

"We are being bullied, my father said, and the only way to handle a bully is to punch him in the face. "What would you do?" I asked. "Strike now. As soon as possible. Meet the enemy straight-up and destroy him. There is no other way." -YAEL DAYAN, daughter of Moshe Dayan, to Steven Pressfield June 5, 1967. The nineteen-year-old state of Israel is surrounded by enemies who want nothing less than her utter extinction. The Soviet-equipped Egyptian Army has massed a thousand tanks on the nation's southern border. Syrian heavy guns are shelling her from the north. To the East, Jordan and Iraq are moving mechanized brigades and fighter squadrons into position to attack. Egypt's President Nasser has declared that the Arab force's objective is "the destruction of Israel." The rest of the world turns a blind eye to the new nation's desperate peril. June 10, 1967. The Arab armies have been routed, ground divisions wiped out, air forces totally destroyed. Israel's citizen-soldiers have seized the Gaza Strip and the Sinai Peninsula from Egypt, the Golan Heights from Syria, East Jerusalem and the West Bank from Jordan. The land under Israeli control has tripled. Her charismatic defense minister, Moshe Dayan, has entered the Lion's Gate of the Old City of Jerusalem to stand with the paratroopers who have liberated Judaism's holiest site-the Western Wall, part of the ruins of Solomon's temple, which has not been in Jewish hands for nineteen hundred years. It is one of the most unlikely and astonishing military victories in history. Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews with veterans of the war-fighter and helicopter pilots, tank commanders and Recon soldiers, paratroopers, as well as women soldiers, wives, and others-bestselling author Steven Pressfield tells the story of the Six Day War as you've never experienced it before: in the voices of the young men and women who battled not only for their lives but for the survival of a Jewish state, and for the dreams of their ancestors. By turns inspiring, thrilling, and heartbreaking, The Lion's Gate is both a true tale of military courage under fire and a journey into the heart of what it means to fight for one's people"-- Provided by publisher.

Considers how the world would be different if the United States had never been founded, retelling the story of how the country was born and discussing aspects of American life that make the U.S. exceptional.

"A vibrant, colorful, and revelatory inner history of China during a moment of profound transformation From abroad, we often see China as a caricature: a nation of pragmatic plutocrats and ruthlessly dedicated students destined to rule the global economy--or an addled Goliath, riddled with corruption and on the edge of stagnation. What we don't see is how both powerful and ordinary people are remaking their lives as their country dramatically changes. As the Beijing correspondent for The New Yorker, Evan Osnos was on the ground in China for years, witness to profound political, economic, and cultural upheaval. In Age of Ambition, he describes the greatest collision taking place in that country: the clash between the rise of the individual and the Communist Party's struggle to retain control. He asks probing questions: Why does a government with more success lifting people from poverty than any civilization in history choose to put strict restraints on freedom of expression? Why do millions of young Chinese professionals--fluent in English and devoted to Western pop culture--consider themselves "angry youth," dedicated to resisting the West's influence? How are Chinese from all strata finding meaning after two decades of the relentless pursuit of wealth? Writing with great narrative verve and a keen sense of irony, Osnos follows the moving stories of everyday people and reveals life in the new China to be a battleground between aspiration and authoritarianism, in which only one can prevail"-- Provided by publisher.

Offers the author's thoughts on addressing the nation's growing debt, deteriorating morals, educational shortcomings, and elitist media, as well as the worsening discourse and inability to take action to solve our problems.

The western world of the 14th century is explored. Covered are crusades and religious influence on daily life as well as the peasants' hardships.

"A hypnotic journey in the company of one of the world's most acclaimed Egyptologists that tells how the Nile continually brought life to an ancient civilization now dead, and how it sustained its successors, now in tumult"--From publisher description.

"In the Baliem Valley in central New Guinea live the Kurelu, a Stone Age tribe that survived into the twentieth century. Peter Matthiessen visited the Kurelu with the Harvard-Peabody expedition in 1961 and wrote Under the mountain wall as an account not of the expedition, but of the great warrior Weaklekek, the swineherd, Tukum, U-mue and his family, and the boy Weake, killed in a surprise raid"--Cover p. [4].

"They were the Princess Dianas of their day--perhaps the most photographed and talked about young royals of the early twentieth century. The four captivating Russian Grand Duchesses--Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia Romanov--were much admired for their happy dispositions, their looks, the clothes they wore and their privileged lifestyle. Over the years, the story of the four Romanov sisters and their tragic end in a basement at Ekaterinburg in 1918 has clouded our view of them, leading to a mass of sentimental and idealized hagiography. With this treasure trove of diaries and letters from the grand duchesses to their friends and family, we learn that they were intelligent, sensitive and perceptive witnesses to the dark turmoil within their immediate family and the ominous approach of the Russian Revolution, the nightmare that would sweep their world away, and them along with it. The Romanov Sisters sets out to capture the joy as well as the insecurities and poignancy of those young lives against the backdrop of the dying days of late Imperial Russia, World War I and the Russian Revolution. Rappaort aims to present a new and challenging take on the story, drawing extensively on previously unseen or unpublished letters, diaries and archival sources, as well as private collections. It is a book that will surprise people, even aficionados"-- Provided by publisher.

"Pulitzer Prize-winning author Wallace Stegner tells about a thousand-mile migration marked by hardship and sudden death?but unique in American history for its purpose, discipline, and solidarity"--From publisher description.

"As John Kennedy Jr.'s creative director for George magazine, Matt Berman had a wonderfully collaborative and fun-loving relationship with America's favorite son--his story is told here with unprecedented candor and wit."--Provided by publisher.

Presents a look at the role of espionage during the American Revolution, chronicling the exploits of a small ring of spies working for George Washington and centered in New York

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