Books

New Arrivals

Citing formidable recovery rates for people addicted to prescription opiates or heroin, a guide inspired by the experiences of addicts in long-term recovery outlines treatment approaches based on new understandings about opiate addiction.

An actress in the porn industry describes her unusual life and discusses her views on women and sexuality as well as offering an inside look into the industry and her relationships with other actors, including her husband.

"In more than 150 frisky photos and stories, at turns hilarious and heartbreaking, 'Colorado mountain dogs' captures the joy and rapture of canines and their human companions as they frolic on trails, in camp, and in creeks. Also included are sidebars on how to photograph dogs, reasons why people have dogs, training tips, and the naming of dogs"--From publisher description.

Drawing from historical records about Andre's life as well as a wealth of anecdotes from his colleagues in the wrestling world, including Hulk Hogan, and his film co-stars (Billy Crystal, Robin Wright, Mandy Patinkin, etc), Brown has created this biography of one of the twentieth century's most recognizable figures.

A spirited, history-rich narrative on the art and science of alcohol that discusses everything from fermentation and distillation to traditions and the effects of alcohol on the body and brain.

"Laura Pritchett is an award-winning author who has quickly become one of the west's defining literary voices. We first met hardscrabble ranchers Renny and Ben Cross in Laura's debut collection, and now in Stars Go Blue, they are estranged, elderly spouses living on opposite ends of their sprawling ranch, faced with the particular decline of a fading farm and Ben's struggle with Alzheimer's disease. He is just on the cusp of dementia, able to recognize he is sick but unable to do anything about it -the notes he leaves in his pockets and around the house to remind him of himself, his family, and his responsibilities are no longer as helpful as they used to be. Watching his estranged wife forced into care-taking and brought to her breaking point, Ben decides to leave his life with whatever dignity and grace remains. As Ben makes his decision, a new horrible truth comes to light: Ray, the abusive husband of their late daughter is being released from prison early. This opens old wounds in Ben, his wife, his surviving daughter, and four grandchildren. Branded with a need for justice, Ben must act before his mind leaves him, and sets off during a brutal snowstorm to confront the man who murdered his daughter. Renny, realizing he is missing, sets off to either stop or witness her husband's act of vengeance. Stars Go Blue is a triumphant novel of the American family, buffered by the workings of a ranch and the music offered by the landscape and animal life upon it. "-- Provided by publisher.

"By the president of the prestigious Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, the life story of the most controversial, volatile, misunderstood provision of the Bill of Rights"-- Provided by publisher.

An updated edition of the author's definitive illustrated guide to pruning is a must-have for gardeners that is organized around common types of plants such as evergreen and deciduous shrubs, bamboos and tea roses, rhododendrons, camellia wisteria and other vines, and tree species from dogwoods to weeping cherries.

"When the teenage daughter of a powerful Washington, D.C., judge is found dead, three local black kids are arrested for her murder but reporter Sully Carter suspects there's more to the case. From the city's grittiest backstreets to the elegant halls of power, wry yet wounded Sully pursues a string of cold cases, all the while fighting against pressure from government officials, police, suspicious locals, and his own bosses at the newspaper. Based on the real-life 1990s Princeton Place murders" -- Provided by publisher.

Tales of a child's fascination with nature are interspersed with the author's lifelong research into the habits, history, and importance of bumblebees and his quest to reintroduce the short-haired bumblebee into its native land.

"In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the 'Sea Peoples' invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this 'First Dark Ages,' Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age--and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece"-- Provided by publisher.

The former NFL player, model, and television actor examines his disadvantaged childhood and long-time marriage to share advice on how to be a responsible family man while maintaining one's masculinity and sense of humor.

Compilation of 52 weekly menu plans to help make dinnertime fun and easy for families.

"An epic saga about a Trinidadian family spanning WWII to the early sixties. Told in alternating voices, the author recounts the story of Marcia, our fierce heroine, who leaves her island home in order to protect the man she's loved for years, and finds herself isolated in a strange land but with the determination to survive and rebuild" -- Provided by publisher.

"In Twee, journalist and cultural observer Marc Spitz surveys the rising Twee movement in music, art, film, fashion, food and politics and examines the cross-pollinated generation that embodies it?from aging hipsters to nerd girls, indie snobs to idealistic industrialists. Spitz outlines the history of twee?the first strong, diverse, and wildly influential youth movement since Punk in the ?70s and Hip Hop in the ?80s?showing how awkward glamour and fierce independence has become part of the zeitgeist"--From publisher description.

"... a visionary argument that our current crisis in government is nothing less than the fourth radical transition in the history of the nation-state. Dysfunctional government: It's become a cliche. And most of us are resigned to the fact that nothing is ever going to change. As John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge show us, that is a seriously limited view of things. In fact, there have been three great revolutions in government in the history of the modern world. The West has led these revolutions, but now we are in the midst of a fourth revolution, and it is Western government that is in danger of being left behind. Now, things really are different. The West's debt load is unsustainable. The developing world has harvested the low-hanging fruits. Industrialization has transformed all the peasant economies it had left to transform, and the toxic side effects of rapid developing world growth are adding to the bill. From Washington to Detroit, from Brasilia to New Delhi, there is a dual crisis of political legitimacy and political effectiveness"-- Provided by publisher.

The CEO of Athenahealth reflects on his journey from ambulance driver to CEO of one of the nation's fastest-growing tech companies to outline a blueprint for improving the current health-care system through innovation, less regulation and a wider range of customer choices.

"James Webb, author of Fields of Fire, the classic novel of the Vietnam War--former U.S. Senator; Secretary of the Navy; recipient of the Navy Cross, Silver Star and Purple Heart as a combat Marine; and a self-described "military brat"--has written an extraordinary memoir of his early years, "a love story--love of family, love of country, love of service," in his words. Webb's mother grew up in the poverty-stricken cotton fields of Eastern Arkansas. His father and life-time hero was the first of many generations of Webbs, whose roots are in Appalachia, to finish high school. He flew bombers in World War II, cargo planes in the Berlin Airlift, graduated from college in middle age, and became an expert in the nation's most advanced weaponry. Webb's account of his childhood is a tremendous American saga as the family endures the constant moves and challenges of the rarely examined Post-World War II military, with his stern but emotionally invested father, loving and resolute mother, a granite-like grandmother who held the family together during his father's frequent deployments, and an assortment of invincible aunts, siblings, and cousins. His account of his four years at Annapolis are painfully honest but in the end triumphant. His description of Vietnam's most brutal battlefields breaks new literary ground. One of the most highly decorated combat Marines of that war, he is a respected expert on the history and conduct of the war. Webb's novelist's eyes and ears invest this work with remarkable power, whether he is describing the resiliency that grew from constant relocations during his childhood, the longing for his absent father, his poignant goodbye to his parents as he leaves for Vietnam, his role as a 23-year-old lieutenant through months of constant combat, or his election to the Senate where he was known for his expertise in national defense, foreign policy, and economic fairness. This is a life that could only happen in America" -- from publisher's web site.

During the height of the Civil War, Gray Wolf, a Cheyenne Indian, seeks help from Georgia McBaye's mother, a healer, and he and Georgia embark on a romance amid the prejudices of their societies

"Denver cab driver, Brendan Murphy -- known to all as 'Murph' -- once again violates his vow never to get involved in the lives of his passengers. This time he is out to rescue two young neo-hippie girls he believes have come under the spell of a cult leader in a commune outside Boulder"--P. [4] of cover.

"The car has shaped the modern era more profoundly than any other human invention. Its manufacture introduced mass-production to the world, bringing with it tarmac, suburbs, and car culture. In this comprehensive world history of the most important transport innovation of the modern age, historian Dr. Steven Parissien examines the impact, development, and significance of the automobile over its turbulent and colorful 130-year history. He tells the story of the automobile, and of its creators, from its earliest appearance in the late nineteenth century - as little more than a powered quadricycle - through the mergers and bailouts of the twenty-first century. Readers will learn about Andre Citroen and his Traction Avant of 1934, Ferdinand Porsche and the Volkswagen, Gene Bordinat and the Ford Mustang, among numerous other game changers and iconic vehicles. Bringing to life the flamboyant entrepreneurs, shrewd businessmen, and gifted engineers that worked behind the scenes to bring us horsepower and performance, The Life of the Automobile is a globe-spanning account of the auto industry that is sure to rev the engines of gearheads across the country. But above all, this book illustrates how the epic story of the car mirrors the history of the modern era, from the brave hopes and soaring ambitions of the late eighteen hundreds to the cynicism and ecological concerns we face more than a century later"-- Provided by publisher.

"Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving aides and Roosevelt family members, Nigel Hamilton offers a definitive account of FDR's masterful--and under appreciated--command of the Allied war effort. Hamilton takes readers inside FDR's White House Oval Study--his personal command center--and into the meetings where he battled with Churchill about strategy and tactics and overrode the near mutinies of his own generals and secretary of war"--Frompublisher description.

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