Books

New Arrivals

When his wife dies decades after their high-profile romance catches the attention of England, a once-alluring playwright struggles with writer's block and rage while his late wife's adult children struggle to understand why they were abandoned for him.

Profiles the people of a small Midwestern town in the early 1900s, revealing the consequences of human misunderstanding.

The thirty-ninth president and Nobel Peace Prize winner reflects on his full and happy life with pride, humor, and a few second thoughts.

"My villages is an intricate tapestry of one woman's personal history, radiant with such skillful weavings of language and images, places and times that Campbell evokes the luminosity of not only her world, but of all our own worlds loved and lost"--Back cover.

"A sinister version of The Perfect Storm. Thrilling'--Sunday Times (UK). There's nothing that armchair adventure lovers relish more than a gripping true story of disaster and heroism, and Last Man Off delivers all that against a breathtaking backdrop of icebergs and killer whales. On June 6, 1998, twenty-three-year-old Matt Lewis had just started his dream job as a scientific observer aboard a deep-sea fishing boat in the waters off Antarctica. As the crew haul in the line for the day, a storm begins to brew. When the captain vanishes and they are forced to abandon ship, Lewis leads the escape onto three life rafts, where the battle for survival begins"-- Provided by publisher.

A thoughtful, poignant novel that explores the creation of Artificial Intelligence illuminating the very human need for communication, connection, and understanding. In a narrative that spans geography and time, from the Atlantic Ocean in the seventeenth century, to a correctional institute in Texas in the near future, and told from the perspectives of five very different characters, Speak considers what it means to be human, and what it means to be less than fully alive.

"This story is rooted in the power of sport, but it is not a sports memoir. Yes, Course Correction chronicles one young woman's transformation from a couch potato-in-training into an elite athlete who reached the highest echelon of her sport. In addition, the book offers a persuasive example of the enormous impact of sports participation on the rest of life and validates the power, import, and necessity of Title IX. Just like Ginny, girls everywhere deserve the chance not only to dream of athletic stardom, but to reach for it. Ginny discovered rowing as a freshman at Yale. From her first strokes as a novice, Ginny found herself in a new world. Starting with her first practice, she trained alongside two Olympics-bound rowers. Then a mere handful of months into her freshman year, she participated in the now renowned Title IX naked protest on campus. That event not only forced Yale to provide equal access to sports facilities for its women athletes, but helped mold the future of women's crew programs across the country. Course Correction recounts the physical and psychological barriers Ginny had to confront and overcome to achieve the extraordinary. Taking place against a backdrop of unprecedented cultural change, Ginny's story personalizes the impact of Title IX, demonstrating the life-changing effects of lessons learned in sports far beyond the athletic fields of play. Her journey winds its way to the Olympic podium in 1984, detouring through the 1980 Olympics, which the United States boycotted at then-president Jimmy Carter's insistence, carries her through family tragedy, strengthens her to face her own demons and truths, and ultimately frees her to live her life despite her persistent fear of loss"-- Provided by publisher.

In the summer of 1977, Victoria Leonard's world changed forever-when Caitlin welcomed Vix into the heart of her sprawling, eccentric family, opening doors to a world of unimaginable priviledge, sweeping her away to vacations on Martha's Vineyard, a magical, wind-blown island whee two friends became summer sisters.

"In an entirely new, global perspective on the Revolutionary period, Kathleen DuVal reveals personal stories such as that of Irish trader Oliver Pollock, Scottish plantation owners James and Isabella Bruce, and Creek leader Alexander McGillivray for whom the American Revolution was more complicated than the issue of colonial independence. These individuals, their communities, and nations weighed their options, deciding based on personal interests whether independent states or loyal British colonies would best serve them as neighbors, let alone future rulers. DuVal explores how so-called American independence affected the lives of those living on the edges of British colonial America, such as slaves, Indians, women, and the colonists of other European nations and finds that the war left some much more free than others. For most of its duration, the outcome of the Revolutionary War was far from certain. DuVal brings us to a region on the edge of the war where it seems that everyone was hedging their bets--the Gulf Coast. As the British tried to hold onto the thirteen rebelling colonies that would eventually be the nascent United States, their loyal colony of West Florida was left vulnerable to Spanish invasion from the west. With the British stretched thin fighting two wars, the clashing empires found enemies and allies for whom loyalty was a calculation more than a feeling"-- Provided by publisher.

One of the most learned and highly trained American-born lamas in the Tibetan Dzogchen tradition invites readers to experience all-inclusive connection through the art of inter-meditation and other original practices that will help them see through the illusion of separation.

The tensions beneath the surface of Claire and Don Lowry's seemingly contented marriage explode in the bedrooms and backyards of a small town over the course of a long, hot summer, as they discover that married life is not what they had predicted.

Draws on recently declassified documents to chronicle one of the most disastrous presidencies in U.S. history, presenting a portrait of a brilliant man overcome by his deep insecurities and his distrust of his cabinet, Congress, and the American people.

"Professional assassin John Lago faces off against his deadliest adversary yet--his wife. At the end of The Intern's Handbook, John tracks down his nemesis Alice but instead of putting a bullet in her head, he puts a ring on her finger and marries her. Together, they execute a hostile takeover of Human Resources, Inc., the "placement agency" that trains young assassins to infiltrate corporations disguised as interns and knock off high profile targets. As HR's former top operatives, they are successful until conflicting management styles cause an ugly breakup that locks John out of the bedroom and the boardroom. But when Alice takes on a new HR target, John is forced to return to the office battlefield in a role he swore he would never play again: the intern. What starts out as a deadly showdown turns into the two of them fighting side by side to save HR, Inc.--and their marriage" -- provided by publisher.

Life has taught Lucas Kendrick, Duke of Harndon, that a heart is a decided liability. Betrayed by his elder brother, rejected by his fiancée, banished by his father, and shunned by his mother, Luke fled to Paris, where he became the most sought-after bachelor in fashionable society. Ten years later, fate has brought him back home to England as head of the family who rejected him. Unwilling as he is to be involved with them, he must assume responsibility for his younger siblings, the family estate he once loved--and the succession. He faces the prospect of marrying with the greatest reluctance--until he sees beguiling Lady Anna Marlowe across a ballroom one night. Anna, far from being the bright-eyed innocent Luke takes her for, is no more a stranger to the shadows of a painful past than he is. But for her, marriage cannot so easily solve what is wrong in her life--not when a tormentor stalks her to the very doors of Bowden Abbey, where Luke and Anna must learn to trust in each other or risk any chance they may have for a happy future.

On August 12, 1944, Lieutenant Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., heir to one of America's most glamorous fortunes, son of the disgraced former ambassador to Great Britain, and big brother to freshly minted PT-109 hero JFK, hoisted himself up into a highly modified B-24 Liberator bomber. The munitions he was carrying that day were fifty percent more powerful than TNT. Kennedy's mission was part of Operation Aphrodite/Project Anvil, a desperate American effort to rescue London from a rain of German V-1 and V-2 missiles. The decision to use these bold but crude precursors to modern-day drones against German V-weapon launch sites came from Air Corps high command. Lieutenant General Jimmy Doolittle, daring leader of the spectacular 1942 Tokyo Raid, and others concocted a plan to install radio control equipment in "war-weary" bombers, pack them with a dozen tons of high explosives, and fly them by remote control directly into the concrete German launch sites--targets too hard to be destroyed by conventional bombs. The catch was that live pilots were needed to get these flying bombs off the ground and headed toward their targets. Joe Jr. was the first naval aviator to fly such a mission. And--in the biggest manmade explosion before Hiroshima--it killed him. Alan Axelrod's Lost Destiny is a rare exploration of the origin of today's controversial military drones as well as a searing and unforgettable story of heroism, WWII, and the Kennedy dynasty that might have been.

"Billy the Kid, Wyatt Earp, and Joaquín Murrieta are fixed in the American imagination as towering legends of the Old West. But that has not always been the case. There was a time when these men were largely forgotten relics of a bygone era. Then, in the early twentieth century, an obscure Chicago newspaperman changed all that. Walter Noble Burns (1872-1932) served with the First Kentucky Infantry during the Spanish-American War and covered General John J. Pershing's pursuit of Pancho Villa in Mexico as a correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. However history-making these forays may seem, they were only the beginning. In the last six years of his life, Burns wrote three books that propelled New Mexico outlaw Billy the Kid, Tombstone marshal Wyatt Earp, and California bandit Joaquín Murrieta into the realm of legend. Despite Burns's remarkable command of his subjects--based on exhaustive research and interviews--he has been largely ignored by scholars because of the popular, even occasionally fictional, approach he employed. In American Mythmaker, the first literary biography of Burns, Mark J. Dworkin brings Burns out of the shadows. Through careful analysis of The Saga of Billy the Kid (1926), Tombstone : an Iliad of the Southwest (1927), and The Robin Hood of Eldorado : the Saga of Joaquin Murrieta (1932) and their reception, Dworkin shows how Burns used his journalistic training to introduce the history of the American West to his era's general readership. In the process, Burns made his subjects household names. Are Burns's books fact or fiction? Was he a historian or a novelist? Dworkin considers these questions as he uncovers the story behind Burns's mythmaking works. A long-overdue biography of a writer who shaped our idea of Western history, American Mythmaker documents in fascinating detail the fashioning of some of the greatest American legends"-- Provided by publisher.

"The lives of the Barretts, a normal suburban New England family, are torn apart when fourteen-year-old Marjorie begins to display signs of acute schizophrenia.To her parents' despair, the doctors are unable to stop Marjorie's bizarre outbursts and subsequent descent into madness. As their home devolves into a house of horrors, they reluctantly turn to a local Catholic priest for help. Father Wanderly suggests an exorcism; he believes the vulnerable teenager is the victim of demonic possession. He also contacts a production company that is eager to document the Barretts plight for a reality television show"--Book jacket.

A legal scholar exposes the psychological forces that undermine the American criminal justice system, arguing that unless hidden biases are addressed, social inequality will widen, and proposes reforms to prevent injustice and help achieve true equality before the law.

An unapologetic filmmaker uses the stories of those around her to create movies that bring her both critical acclaim and ire from the people whose secrets she has exposed.

"On March 25, 1911, as workers were getting ready to leave for the day, a fire broke out in the Triangle shirtwaist factory in New York's Greenwich Village. Within minutes it spread to consume the building's upper three stories. Firemen who arrived at the scene were unable to rescue those trapped inside: their ladders simply weren't tall enough. People on the street watched in horror as desperate workers jumped to their deaths. The final toll was 146 people - 123 of them women. It was the worst workplace disaster in New York City History." "This harrowing yet compulsively readable book is both a chronicle of the Triangle shirtwaist fire and a vibrant portrait of an entire age. It follows the waves of Jewish and Italian immigration that inundated New York in the early years of the century, filling its slums and supplying its garment factories with cheap, mostly female labor. It portrays the Dickensian work conditions that led to a massive waist-worker's strike in which an unlikely coalition of socialists, so

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